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Whitney Houston has died at age 48, a publicist has confirmed to the AP. The singer, who has sold 200 million records and won six Grammys, was spotted out as recently as Thursday, according to The Hollywood Reporter, attending a pre-Grammy party in Hollywood hosted by singer Kelly Price. She was also scheduled to appear at Clive Davis' annual Grammy bash tonight. TMZ reports the singer died at the Beverly Hilton Hotel, where a police crime lab vehicle was spotted parked outside. THR also reports that Houston was overheard "chastising an assistant" on Thursday morning at the hotel, and later that night "got into an altercation" with Stacy Francis, a finalist on The X Factor.  

In 2009, the singer detailed for Oprah Winfrey how she freebased cocaine for years with husband Bobby Brown, an addiction that ravaged her voice and made her a popular tabloid target. No details have yet been released regarding the cause of death, or whether or not it was drug-related. Updates to follow.

UPDATE: CNN reports Ray-J, younger brother of Brandy and Houston's recent love interest, discovered Houston's body in her hotel room. Then a rep for Ray-J called in to discredit this, saying that Ray-J was nowhere near the hotel, but that his client "is distraught and, quote, 'trippin right now,'" according to a CNN anchor.

UPDATE 2: TMZ puts the time of death at 3:55 p.m. PT. Paramedics were called in after Houston was found unresponsive in her room. Police arrived within minutes and the fire department was already at the hotel on another call. Paramedics performed CPR but it failed to revive the singer.

UPDATE 3: LAPD says Houston's body has not yet been removed from the hotel. Mariah Carey tweets: "Heartbroken and in tears over the shocking death of my friend, the incomparable Ms. Whitney Houston...She will never be forgotten as one of the greatest voices to ever grace the earth."

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