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Tina Brown showed up on Morning Joe today discussing the zombie Princess Diana on the cover of Newsweek cover. Both she and the magazine have been taking fire from all sides for the digitally aged representation of Diana walking next to Kate Middleton for this week's cover story. Newsweek readers have passionately and relentlessly expressed their discontent on Facebook and in comments sections around the web.

Yahoo's Dylan Stableford called Tina's cover package "pure fan fiction." Probably trying to lighten things up, Newsweek senior writer Andrew Romano joked on Twitter, "Printing a photoillustration of Diana at 50 is one thing. But calling her a whale princess? I am outraged. Outraged!" He's talking about MSNBC's banner during the Morning Joe interview with Brown, pictured above.

Somehow Tina's staying positive about the whole thing. Brown said in a statement, "We wanted to bring the memory of Diana alive in a vivid image that transcends time and reflected my piece." The Newsweek editor-in-chief echoed this sentiment on Morning Joe:

I found it really interesting to imagine what she woudl be doing now and the best way to kind of communicate that would be to put her in a situation where she's standing there with Kate Middleton. Because I wanted to make her a time traveler…

"What's the response been?" asked host Joe Scarborough.

Well, it went absolutely viral actually in the last two days because the cover has created a huge amount of debate. Some people think it's kind of spooky and ‘Should we have done it?' and others think it's very effective. I think it's a very intriguing package to show what she'd be like today. You know we aged her just slightly… to me it's just sad, a saddening thing.

Of Brown's Morning Joe appearance, Gawker's Richard Lawson responded, "It is a saddening thing, truly. And if it's a saddening thing for Tina Brown, just imagine how big of a saddening thing it is for, like, Diana's kids. Clearly William and Harry havenever caught themselves wondering what it would be like for their mother to still be alive, so it's a good, noble thing that Tina Brown stepped in and imagined it for them." 

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