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This morning, Washington's elite woke up to the political soapboxing of Fran Drescher in a space typically reserved for pundits, pollsters, mayors and strategists: the op-ed pages of DC insider newspaper The Hill. It seems the Nanny actress is continuing her quest for political legitimacy via one of her favorite hobby horses: cosmetics. Still, she's not letting Washington's buttoned-up culture suppress her Flushing, Queens spunk: behold, her ability to make the regulation of makeup, shampoo and deodorant a fun, easily-understood issue.

Many of our trading partners, including Canada and the European Union, already have much tougher rules than we do about protecting their citizens with safer cosmetics and personal care products. So companies have to make safer products for those markets anyway! Why would they foist toxic products on Americans? What are we, chopped liver?

This morning's op-ed is just another notch in the belt for her post-Nanny political career and we congratulate Drescher for setting slightly more realistic ambitions for herself, then, say, trying to fill Hillary's Clinton's old U.S. Senate seat. Cue the tape:

Larry King "Fran Drescher... has thrown her hat into the ring to be selected by the governor of New York to be the senator replacing Hillary Clinton: Why?"

Fran Drescher: "You know Larry, ever  since I became a cancer survivor I feel like I got famous, I got cancer and I lived to help people,  I've been very active in Washington for years now. I just feel like I'd represent the New York people really well... I've been very vocal about speaking about civil liberties and education. I feel like I've moved away from the acting career... I find that all roads lead to Rome and nowadays Rome is Capitol Hill."

Yeah, better stick to forcing Revlon to label all of its ingredients on the bottle.

(hat tip: Niraj Chokshi)

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