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Who was the man behind @MayorEmanuel? Even Rahm Emanuel wanted to know. The mystery tweeter delighted many during the famously-profane real Emanuel's five-month campaign to be mayor of Chicago; on election night, he tweeted gems like, "If you have a giant fucking pile of money and a bunch of dumb fucks running against you, DREAMS DO COME TRUE," and, referring to Emanuel's share of the vote, "FIFTY FOUR MOTHERFUCKING PERCENT, BITCHES," and, "I'M FUCKING RIDING ON THE BODIES OF THE MEN AND WOMEN OF CHICAGO, AND I FUCKING LOVE EVERY ONE OF YOU."

Our esteemed colleague Alexis Madrigal revealed the satirically profane tweeter today: His name is Dan Sinker, he's a Knight journalism fellow at Stanford, and he's the founder of the zine Punk Planet. A lot of people are very excited about this revelation. These people can be divided into five distinct groups.

1. People Who Love Chicago Politics

Examples: David Axelrod (Will he miss @MayorEmanuel? "You're freakin' A right, I do!"), and the real Rahm Emanuel, who offered a $2,500 reward for @MayorEmanuel's identity.

2. Media People

Examples: The Chicago Tribune's editorial board, which begged @MayorEmanuel to "@keepitgoing," Snark Market, Politico.

3. People Addicted to the F Word

Your humble correspondent feels she is properly classified here.

4. People Addicted to Twitter

These people
. Also, if we were to make a Venn diagram of this chart, this category would be made up almost entirely of people drawn from groups 1, 2 and 3.

5. People Who Loved Zines

Fans of Sinker's Punk Planet were awash in nostalgia at the revelation. From 1994 till 2007, Sinker and staff "created a punk rock tent big enough happily include Black Flag and filmmaker Miranda July," Madrigal writes. "Punk Planet wasn't just a music magazine. It was the distillation of a punk rock worldview in magazine form." Get out your Sharpies, put on your Docs, and remember your spiked-and-studded glory days. The revelation lead to original media blogger Jim Romenesko (who also can be counted among groups 1, 2, 3 and 4) dusting off an old clip in which he remembers getting a copy of his Factsheet Five. 

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