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Unlike its flagship Mario brand, Nintendo hasn't rolled out quite the figurative red-carpet for the twenty-fifth anniversary of its other beloved franchise, The Legend of Zelda. For those who can recall (we can't; our introduction to the swashbuckling Link was during the Ocarina of Time era), the brand made its debut in 1986 on the Japanese Famcom and NES systems. In the years since, the characters have graced more than 15 other games and appeared in various other Nintendo titles (Link had a formidable arsenal in the cult classic N64 version of Super Smash Bros.)


Naturally, as Zelda turns the page on a quarter century, more than a few gamers are turning nostalgic. For those basking in the anniversary of Zelda, here's the best places to revel in the franchise's ever-evolving mythology.
  • The Comprehensive 25th Anniversary Guide To Zelda  - 1Up.com  and by comprehensive, the website does mean it. Peruse guides detailing the 25 Best Theme Song covers all the way to the most embarrassing moments, and a well-reasoned defense as to why "The Legend of Zelda: A Link to the Past is still the franchise's gold standard." Short version: "It did more than any other entry to define the franchise's format, introducing as it did concepts like the Dark World. And it was one of the most ambitious as well, featuring roughly a dozen sprawling dungeons."
  • The Top 12 Characters In 25 Years - Wired UK  If you thought the Deku Tree, Ganondorf, and Majora were never given their due, than you'll appreciate Mark Brown's effort to contextualize the "best" characters from the sprawling mythology. On Ganandorf: "Ganondorf is the ultimate evil bad guy, with more costumes and personas than Lady Gaga. Sometimes he’s a ginger-haired bloke with a giant sword and a phantom horse that can leap through paintings, while sometimes he’s a monstrous Minotaur with a fire-spewing trident. He can’t make up his mind, but one thing's for sure: he’s always terrifying, but scared to death of silver arrows."

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