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Exposing the foibles of U.S. foreign policy may be good for the soul, but it's tough on the bank account, particularly when you're also fighting extradition on unrelated sexual assault charges. This is the dilemma facing WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange: when you're in the business of exposing secrets, how do you stay in business? Initially, Assange took the predictable route, striking a $1.3 million deal in December to write his memoirs. At the time, Assange said he was undertaking the project reluctantly. "I need to defend myself and keep WikiLeaks afloat," he told the Sunday Times.

Two months later, that need has forced Assange to consider other fundraising measures. Behold, the WikiLeaks gift shop. Run by German firm Spreadshirt AG, it has everything you need to look great and disclose state secrets. Plus, "all proceedings go to WikiLeaks operations," which is presumably to say Julian Assange's legal team. A look at some of the most striking merchandise, which includes enough T-shirts and hoodies to keep Mark Zuckerberg clothed till at least his next Obama dinner:


A not-so-subtle homage to Assange's Time magazine cover photo. Or the poster for The People vs. Larry Flynt.


Because no WikiLeaks crusader can every be with caught without a laptop. Just don't try bringing it into your neighborhood U.S. embassy.


That would be Julian Assange's face. The typographical printing design was donated to WikiLeaks by someone named Harrison Stahl, who should be getting a visit from the IRS fairly soon.


BECAUSE PEOPLE LIKE CLOTHES THAT SHOUT AT THEM.


If Che Guevara ever wore a sensible suit jacket, it would look something like this.


A sensible, summery tote for WikiLeaks' sensible, summery supporters. All three of them.


Another shout-y message, this one emblazoned on a black hoodie. Look for this to be the shop's top seller.


Show her you care: buy her a slim cut t-shirt with a quote from Julian Assange stenciled across the chest.

This article is from the archive of our partner The Wire.

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