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The latest salvo in the Cleveland vs. Lebron James saga has indeed been tweeted. And it appears that writing a Comic Sans screed apparently has Karmic consequences. At the very least, Cleveland Cavaliers owner Dan Gilbert probably should have thought twice last summer before typing the words: "I PERSONALLY GUARANTEE THAT THE CLEVELAND CAVALIERS WILL WIN AN NBA CHAMPIONSHIP BEFORE THE SELF-TITLED FORMER 'KING' WINS ONE."

Lebron James has been eager to respond to that caps-lock sentence for months now, it seems. And with the Los Angeles Lakers crushing his former team by 55 points (the largest amount the Lakers have beaten any team since 1972) he probably figured it was appropriate time to invoke Karma. Here's James offending tweet:

Crazy. Karma is a b****.. Gets you every time. Its not good to wish bad on anybody. God sees everything!less than a minute ago via ÜberTwitter


And, of course, reactions from the peanut gallery:


  • NBC Miami - "It's rare to see athletes taking much pleasure in a defeat that has little to do with their team"
  • Yahoo! Sports - "LeBron handled his business Tuesday night like a fool, treating the Cavs like hellbound sinners deserving of whichever terrible fate befalls them."
  • CBS Sports- "If LeBron James really wants to be taken seriously as a heel, he's going to have spend a little more time watching pro wrestling and a little less time at the TweetDeck."
  • ESPN - "To some, this is unbelievably crass. To them I say: This ain't nothing. The rhetoric of competitive people often gets out of hand."
  • SB Nation - "Karma would be the Miami Heat being forced to move to Cleveland, making LeBron play in front of those same crowds once again."
  • Dime - "Think he still has animosity for all those burnt jerseys? Nah."
  • Time Newsfeed - "But just think about the meaning of your tweet....Why wouldn't [karma] now come after you?"

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