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At least one person thinks it's a splendid idea to dress up a description-heavy literary classic for 3D blockbuster treatment. That would be Baz Luhrmann--director of Moulin Rouge and Australia--musing to the Hollywood Reporter about whether he will shoot his upcoming adaptation of The Great Gatsby using 3D technology. Even though it's been a mere hours since Luhrmann's speculation, moviegoers, Fitzgerald fans and culture writers appeared to initially be gripped with fear at this possibility (In the directors defense, a few writers seem to be slowly warming to the idea):

  • The Washington Post - "This is like making Waiting for Godot in 3D so you can actually feel Godot's absence."
  • New York - "On one hand, nothing seems less indicative of twenties, old-world glamour than a 3-D movie. On the other, uh, Fitzgerald liked opulence, and it might look cool?"
  • The Atlantic - "Every poem shouldn't be made a painting. Art is not necessarily made better by literalization."
  • Village Voice - "Forgo the funny glasses and just read it again."
  • New York Observer - "The subtle analysis of class warfare, sexuality, and post-war mores that enhance F. Scott Fitzgerald's masterwork will probably be excised, but who cares!"
  • Time - "Not even Leonardo DiCaprio and Carey Mulligan...would be able to hold our attention amid the likely distraction of three dimensional jewels and mint juleps."
  • The Guardian, quoting Dave Calhoun - "It's comparable to being forced to cast Lindsay Lohan rather than, say, Rebecca Hall in a film because the first might sell more tickets. You might do your best with Lohan, but it would probably be better if she wasn't in your film at all."

And, very possibly, an understatement:


  • Forbes - "Luhrmann says he's not surprised to see some skepticism about widespread adoption of 3D."



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