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You're running late to the office. After dashing to the building and frantically punching the elevator button you're headed to the right floor. Except, hunger strikes. Normally you avoid the "Fresh Findz" pre-packaged sandwich depot on the fourth floor. But today you're really hungry. "Findz" doesn't look that bad, and you purchase a sandwich wrap, double back to the elevator, peel away the plastic wrapping, and bite off more than you can chew. And then break your tooth on an errant olive pit.

Sadly, this unenviable, imaginary scenario appears to be similar to the experience of Congressmen Dennis Kucinich on one morning in April 2008. At the very least, it provides a rationale for why he's now decided to sue the House of Representatives office cafeteria for $150,000 in damages caused after said errant olive pit caused "permanent dental and oral injuries requiring multiple surgical and dental procedures."

"Said sandwich wrap was unwholesome and unfit for human consumption in that it was presented to contain pitted olives, yet unknown to plaintiff, contained an unpitted olive or olives which plaintiff did not reasonably expect to be in the food prepared for him, and could not visually detect prior to consumption," the lawsuit stated (via the Cleveland Plain Dealer).

[H/T: Cheat Sheet]


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