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Another week, another round of great comments from our readers. Here's a selection:

On Tuesday's post about Chinese President Hu Jintao's visit to the U.S., undenial argued that a new world order was upon us:

The winds of change have blown away the old world and now we stand at the precipice of the new age wherein China and Brazil will be calling the shots ... China doesn't have to worry too much about "us" now because Iraq and Afghanistan have displayed our incompetence to the world. Now we have to play ball with "them" and at the very least, never forget, they are our largest creditor.

On Tuesday's post about research indicating that college students don't learn much, Jeremiah Wood offered one explanation for the finding:

I blame a lot of this on grade inflation. In the science courses at my school, many students work really hard to earn even a B or C and those students learn a hell of a lot to get those grades. But also at my school, in some departments (cougheducationcough), the classes are easy and the grades are all As.

On Wednesday's post on Andrew Breitbart throwing an 80's-themed party to welcome gays to the Republican Party, Super Chundy recalled a vintage Wire moment--when Breitbart and libertarian commentator Conor Friedersdorf sparred in a war of words in our comments section:

(Remember that one time Andrew Breitbart commented here? I do!)

On Wednesday's post about WikiLeaks obtaining data on alleged tax dodgers, Kelli Kobor felt all the opinions we rounded up missed the point:

Previous leaks were about government activities. This one (and the BofA leak which may be imminent) are about private (criminal) activities that government has let slide!

Where has our Justice Department, FBI, SEC, etc. BEEN for the past decade, but especially the past three years???? If WikiLeaks can raise that question, we are in for a whole new ball game. Go Julian, go!!

On Wednesday's post about the upcoming Coachella music festival, Rob took a look at the lineup and drew a conclusion about the state of rock n' roll:

Seriously, Kings of Leon, ugh. Too many bands and musicians taking their "art" way too seriously. One of the reasons there are no more Elivises or Rolling Stones is because it's become such a business that no one remembers that rock n roll is supposed to be fun. Pull up YouTube and watch Robert Plant do an interview--that's why Led Zeppelin was so successful.

On Wednesday's post on the Comcast-NBC merger, TheAtlantic64 challenged those who claim the deal hurts consumers:

Why should the primary concern be consumers? we live in a capitalist society, so business interests are important, too. kudos to comcast for running a company well and not needing taxpayer money to bail them out. if, as a consumer, you don't like it, don't buy cable.

On Thursday's post about whether it's fair for artists to engage in so-called "ruin porn" by photographing Detroit's plight, Tony Comstock discoursed on porn, in all its various forms, irritated with the very designation, "ruin porn":

It's very important that all photographic depictions that are both compelling and disquieting be labeled as "porn". Such labeling makes dismissing the image-makers, the subjects and the thoughts and feeling provoked by the image infinitely easier.

See also: Food Porn, Supply-chain Porn, Poverty Porn, and of course Pornography itself.

On Thursday's post about James Taranto's theory that liberal women hate Sarah Palin because of abortion and jealousy, GordonSewer wondered whether Taranto's employer, the Wall Street Journal, would hire him:

Can I get a column at the WSJ if I can invent a bunch of reasons why James Taranto hates women? Is that how this works?

And finally, it seems Kyle Orland has played Oregon Trail more recently than we have, correcting our headline:

You get Dysentery in Oregon Trail, not Diptheria.

Thanks everyone for another great week of debate.

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