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Ahead of his 90th birthday, dystopian literary giant Ray Bradbury aired some interesting opinions to the L.A. Times on Monday. On the subject of space travel, he said President Obama "should be announcing that we should go back to the moon." The end goal being to colonize mars:

We should never have left there. We should go to the moon and prepare a base to fire a rocket off to Mars and then go to Mars and colonize Mars. Then when we do that, we will live forever.

In the freewheeling interview, the Fahrenheit 451 author also criticized the president and technology:

I think our country is in need of a revolution. There is too much government today. We've got to remember the government should be by the people, of the people and for the people... We have too many cellphones. We've got too many Internets. We have got to get rid of those machines. We have too many machines now.

Reacting to the interview, James Joyner is bewildered. "That a man of Bradbury’s intelligence and insight can hold such diametrically opposed thoughts is an amusing reminder of the limits of human rationality." Nick Gillespie at Reason adds, "Thanks, Ray, for making your work more difficult to access, you Luddite old fart."

But Bradbury is not without his supporters. Giving a full-throated defense of the author Warner Todd Huston at Gateway Pundit tells critics to back off the almost 90-year-old author:

Naturally the misinformed, and those unable to think clearly — by that I mean liberals — think that Bradbury is an old coot that is off his rocker. How can he say we should be going back to the moon but still be against “big government,” they fume. This is a simpleton’s point, the sort of idiotic, childish taking point that one would expect from halfwits like Keith Olbermann or Media Matters.

You see, Bradbury did not say he’s against “government.” He never said that government has no role in life. It is possible to be against welfare spending, the so-called stimulus, and Obama’s ever growing tendrils of Big Brotherism without thinking that government shouldn’t help fund a space program. Further, Bradbury did not state that only government can get us back to the moon, either.

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