>We all knew it was building to this. But I don't think any of us, anywhere, predicted that when Community reached a new apex in its short but already-esteemed history of pop-culture referentiality, it would be this glorious. Last night, the Greendale Community College campus was ravaged by paint, sexual tension, and perhaps the best action-movie parody ever to appear on screen, big or small.

And Community proved that it does need its trademark verbal gags to be great: its creators can rely almost entirely on visual homages and play in a variety of emotional palettes. Hell, they can even make a long-anticipated-but-not-really-working sexual pairing plausible. At this point, there's literally nothing I'd put past them. But, as usual, the show also offered up a multiplicity of lessons on the dangers of college life:

1. People without a lot of status are prepared to fight to the death, as long as the prize is right. Awakening from a nap in his car, Jeff found a devastated campus, and the first of what were to be many victims:


2. College cliques are fractious as hell, and dangerous when cornered.


3. For minority students, the pressure to be campus role models all the time can be a real pain in the ass. Particularly when there's early registration on the line, and the campus has been ravaged.


This is the kind of message the show excels at, coating an itchy truth, particularly one about race, in humor and delivering it with the force of at least a paintball to the chest.

4. Administrators, no matter the size of the school, eventually get drunk on the power.

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