He evidently ran a 4.4 in the 40 yard dash and now the Lions and the 49ers are looking at him hard. Matt Bowen is skeptical:


The 40 times? A good number, but a number that we see from plenty of rookie prospects who don't have the baggage and did play competitive football in 2009.

 Instead, to see the true value of Jones, a club has to sign him and get him into their off-season program to see if he has any dedication to the game and see him on the field--mini camps, OTAs and training camps. He needs work, and he needs to get that work against NFL receivers and NFL quarterbacks in a competitive setting. One-on-ones, team drills and the individual drills done in a practice environment to get his footwork and his technique back up to game speed. Not to mention the preseason come August to see if he can tackle, and play within the defensive system.

It's always amazing to me to see people fumble away talent--so much so, that it actually makes me wonder whether our whole concept of "talent" is off. We tend to think of "talent" as the thing God gave you, and the "work ethic" as a matter of sheer will. But I wonder if "work ethic" isn't just short-hand for other factors--like, for instance, self-expectations developed from a series of experiences. And then maybe some part of a "work ethic" is itself innate. Who knows.

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