I should leave this alone, and if this post disappoints you for its lack of high-mindedness, forgive me. I just can't get past how you can never meet someone, have absolutely no sense of their actual life, and yet assume the role of spiritual adviser. Brit Hume is still trumpeting his arrogant, profane rendition of religion all over the airwaves, claiming that he alone has found the key to Tiger Woods alleged inner turmoil:

"I think, because I'm a Christian and I believe that Christianity is true, that Tiger Woods and his wife Elin would be a lot farther down the road toward forgiveness and redemption if they were both Christians," Hume told Bill O'Reilly Monday. "But they're not. And they're going to do the best they can with what they have. And I wish Tiger Woods well."

In my life, and in my writing, I'm motivated by a belief in the individual. I think people are different, and relationships between people are different, and thus healing different relationships between different people will, necessarily, be different. Put simply there are some basics--respect, for instance--but what is good for me may, or may not, be good for you.

Perhaps I take this whole thing too personal. Brit Hume is that species of human who I've had to cope with throughout the twelve years I've been in this partnership. He's never met you, doesn't know you from the next Tyrone or Tremaine, but is certain that your life, and your partner's life, would be better if you both put on the ring.

When I hear Brit Hume telling people who he does not know that he, a human afflicted with all the ignorance that afflicts us all in this endeavor, has the One True Answer For All People, and all other answers are wrong, I hear him stumping for a cult. It's religious politicking mixed with gossip journalism. It's low, sanctimonious, and mocks the very religion he claims to represent.

You can't balance other people's checkbooks. Especially when your own accounts--like all of our accounts--are in disarray.

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