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I haven't seen the print edition of Newsweek, but according to Media Matters and Michelle Malkin (wow, there's a link you don't see here everyday) the cover is just one of three shots focusing on Sarah Palin's body.  This is the image accompanying Christopher Hitchens' essay. You can read the Hitchens' piece (which I liked a great deal) and make of the pairing what you will.

From my humble vantage point, taken together, the focus on Sarah Palin's body is creepy, and yeah, sexist. I can't imagine them doing this with any male politician, no matter how devoid of ideas.


UPDATE: Wanted to give props to SapphireCate for the catch. And also promote this comment from Deborah, which says, what I could not:

The actual shot used in Runner's World is one I can see dozens of sitting politicians or serious business professionals doing. It seems very in line with that whole "we must promote healthy living for our citizens, especially young people" vibe. I could easily see GWB doing something like it, especially before being president.

The photo of her by the flag is kind of awful, but I doubt she was providing the artistic guidance. It seems very unfair to take a fitness shot and use it to make a point about how unfit for office she is.

I'll say it again: the winking shot. In the debate. Use that one and no one can cry sexism, because she pulled that starburst move in a serious political forum.

They took a photo of her being non-political (promoting jogging) and put it in a political context. They seem to have been hunting for a shot of her being as sexy and unserious as possible, which this meets--because you can see her legs in exercise wear, and because she was talking about exercise to an exercise magazine. It's something I can see Newsweek trying on Bachmann or Pelosi for a similar "is this gal serious? No!" story, and it would be sexist. I don't see them doing the same to a male politician to demonstrate that he must be unserious.

I'd love to hear Deborah's thoughts on the doll...


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