A few people have mentioned this:

I love TNC and his blog, and I particularly love it when he says he junked his tv but blogs endlessly about Mad Men and NFL and even a little about Houswives. You junked your tv but you still watch tv so how does it really matter that the old tv is gone? funny is as funny does.

I am aware that there are a lot of pretentious pricks out there who brag about throwing out their television. With that I mind, I think I should clarify a few things as this idea of "getting rid of the television" seems to make people think I'm more noble than I actually am.

1.) I don't own a television because I'm prone to watching things that, ultimately, make me feel bad about myself and the country I live. Again, this is particular to me. Watching television over the net allows me to watch only what I'm really willing to pay for. It puts me in a much better mood. That's how it works. The point was never to "stop watching TV," or even "watch less TV." It was too watch TV that really wanted to see, that I couldn't live without. The point was to stop consuming things that made me want to kill myself.

2.) I don't know who knows this and who doesn't, but you can actually get a fair amount of TV--including Mad Men--over the internet. If you're latte-sipping, wine-track, arugla-chomping, fornicating, Manhattan-living elitist like me, you can actually get the NFL too.

3.) I think people see "I don't have a television" and they expect the next few sentences to be a speech about the idiot box, and the requisite evils of broadcasting.

Here's the thing--and this goes for most of what I write. I can only blog about myself, it's the only thing I really know in any detail. Owning a television didn't work for my family. I would never suggest that it's not working for your family. I make no brief against television, nor am I particularly interested in one.

4.) Again, one reason I'm unlikely to lead a brigade against television is because some of my happiest hours are spent prancing around asĀ  a red-headed elf. When you're a WoW-geek, it becomes difficult to argue for stigmatization, say, Dollhouse-geeks. I'm not here to balance anyone else's check-book. I can barely balance my own

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