Yeah, I'm late on this, but what can I say? Sometimes my brain is slow. Anyway, from John Harwood:

LESTER HOLT: John what we saw in that protest today, was it simply frustration or does it represent a serious problem the President is having with an important part of his base?

JOHN HARWOOD: As a practical matter Lester I don't think it's a serious problem. we've seen and certainly Bill Clinton learned that they Democratic President can get punished by the mainstream of the electorate for being too aggressive on social issues so for now I think the administration feels that if they take care of the big issues -- health care, energy, the economy -- he's going to be just fine with this group.

HOLT: But in general when yo look at the left as a whole, have there been conversations about some things they thought would have been done but haven't?

HARWOOD: Sure but If you look at the polling, Barack Obama is doing well with 90% or more of Democrats so the White House views this opposition as really part of the "internet left fringe" Lester. And for a sign of how seriously the White House does or doesn't take this opposition, one adviser told me today those bloggers need to take off their pajamas, get dressed and realize that governing a closely divided country is complicated and difficult.

I guess I should be pissed of at Obama since I'm "blogger" who works in his pajamas. Whatever. When I was seven I collected stamps. By the time I was eight I was playing D&D.I've been fielding geek insults since I shot my way out my Ma Dukes. This ain't nothing but water to me.

That aside, there is some expectation that journalists won't grant their sources anonymity, so that they can simply run down people they don't like. Anonymity is usually granted when the source has something of value to say. I could be wrong, but I don't think "take off your pajamas and get dressed" really qualifies. It just feels like gossip, or reporters giving cover to some White House "advisor" so that he can tell "Ya mamma" jokes.

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