The New York gov does the knowledge:

Gov. David A. Paterson lashed out on Friday at critics who say he should not run for election, and he suggested that he was being undermined by an orchestrated, racially biased effort by the media to force him to step aside.

The governor, on a morning radio talk show, said that Gov. Deval Patrick of Massachusetts, the only other African-American governor, was suffering similar treatment, and he predicted that President Obama would, too.

"We're not in the postracial period," he told Errol Louis, a columnist for The Daily News and the host of the radio program, on WWRL-AM. "My feeling is it's being orchestrated, it's a game, and people who pay attention know that," he added.

Probably not. It's hard to take that line when given that most black New Yorkers want Paterson to step aside:

With Mr. Paterson's approval ratings remaining low, some Democrats have suggested publicly that he should make way for the popular attorney general, Andrew M. Cuomo, in the governor's race. Especially worrisome to the governor's supporters is his flagging support even among black voters; a Siena College poll released last month showed that black voters, by a 46-to-38 percent margin, would prefer someone other than Mr. Paterson as governor.

Black politicians were measured in their responses on Friday.

"I do agree with the governor's statement that we do not live in a postracial society and that there is a degree of media bias that does adversely impact communities of color," said Assemblyman Hakeem Jeffries, a Brooklyn Democrat. "But the governor's problems are very complex and cannot be attributed to any one particular issue."

Assemblyman Karim Camara, also of Brooklyn, said: "It's hard to pinpoint why he is struggling. I don't believe there is any one reason. I believe there are a multitude of factors."

Keep in mind that this is the first black governor in New York's history. I can't see how he could possibly think he could win with his base unsecured.


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