I've gotten some requests to comment on Megan's marriage post:

But more to the point, once we'd decided to do what spouses do, why wouldn't we, well, become official spouses?  Just because I enjoy akward five-minute conversations about how my "partner" is a he, not a she, and you know, we really love each other, but we just don't believe we need society's ratification . . . I don't, I assure you.  And I'm happy to have society's ratification.  Celebrating our marriage will be one question upon which society and I agree 100%.

There are tax consequences for couples whose incomes are roughly equal, as one commenter pointed out. But we are, sadly, not in the happy position of having dual half-million-dollar salaries we need to shelter from the grasping tax man.  Besides, marriage is not an investment strategy.  And I suspect that the more you treat it like an investment strategy, the less likely it is to work.

I mean if domestic partnership is working for you, I'm happy for you.  But when I thought about the reasons not to get married, they mostly boiled down to an instinct for contrariness.  I don't need to put myself through a bunch of legal hassle and domestic partner registration just to prove something to Jerry Falwell and my eighth grade history teacher.

I've thought some about this. After much consideration, weighing and consultation I think that best way to capture my sentiment is this:

CONGRATULATIONS!!!

What? You expected a brief attacking marriage as antiquated institution? Meh. People decide what's antiquated, and what's not, by their actions--not overrated writers. Moreover, I've already explained the situation in this household--with an emphasis on this household. I think people should do what makes them happy. Last I looked, I wasn't sleeping with Peter Suderman (dude's legs are too hairy) and that basic idea guides anything that should be said.

I thoroughly reject any nomination as an expert on anything--but most of all on intimate relationships between people. Moreover, as Megan's friend and band-mate, as someone who's actually talked to her about this very subject, I think Congratulations is the sincerest, smartest--and most importantly--loving sentiment I can offer.

We want to hear what you think about this article. Submit a letter to the editor or write to letters@theatlantic.com.