How desperate can it get? This desperate:

There has been speculation about this which I've ignored, no doubt because there are enough policy reasons to oppose Barack Obama and I don't want to feed into what sounds, at first blush, like Vince Fosteresque paranoia.  But I've finally read Jack Cashill's lengthy analysis in The American Thinker.  It is thorough, thoughtful, and alarming -- particularly his deconstruction of the text in Obama's memoir and comparison to the themes, sophistication and signature phraseology of Bill Ayers' memoir.

There is nothing in Obama's scant paper trail prior to 1995 that would suggest something as stylish and penetrating as, at times, Dreams from My Father is.  And when Obama speaks extemporaneously, one doesn't hear the same voice one encounters in the book.  Now maybe Obama has a backlog of writing fom Columbia or Harvard that signal great literary promise, but he not only hasn't shared it, he's assiduously hidden traces of it.  And, to be sure, writing is different from speaking -- in fairness, some of Obama's off-the-cuff bumbling when he speaks is certainly due to the rigors of the campaign which would cause even the most gifted communicator to faulter from time to time.  But it's not unreasonable to expect more similarity between Obama the writer and Obama the orator.

GG conservatives.

UPDATE: More on literary criticism for the low-info voters from Edge of The West:

At The Corner, Andy McCarthy evaluates Cashill's argument and proves himself to be an idiot by finding Cashill's "lengthy analysis . . . thorough, thoughtful, and alarming--particularly his deconstruction of the text in Obama's memoir and comparison to the themes, sophistication and signature phraseology of Bill Ayers' memoir." To be blunt: if you find Cashill's identification of "sea imagery" and his lists of words both Obama and Ayers use to be particularly anything other than laughable pablum, you're an eighth-wit.

If, however, you only use Cashill's juvenile musings as a hypothetical which, if true, suggests all the unsavory things you already believe about Obama, then you've fully embraced the Cashill Doctrine. What do I mean by that? If you deconstruct Cashill's name, you'll find that it contains the words "cash" and shill." "Cash" refers to paper bank notes which, in more robust times, could be exchanged for goods or services. A "shill," according to the Oxford English Dictionary, is "one who poses as a disinterested advocate of another but is actually of the latter's party; a mouthpiece, a stooge." It goes without saying that shills often shill for cash, but in this case, I think we can say the shill's shilling for cash and attention.


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