So the latest spin is that Palin's problem wasn't a shocking ignorance of the issues, but that she was being "too scripted" by the McCain campaign. This is a pretty laughable bit of science fiction, an attempt to bend the fabric of reality, by reciting the problem backward, In fact the whole reason that Palin was "too scripted," is because she is shockingly ignorant of the issues. Furthermore, there is nothing scripted about this:

COURIC: Have you ever been involved with any negotiations, for example, with the Russians?

PALIN: We have trade missions back and forth. We-- we do-- it's very important when you consider even national security issues with Russia as Putin rears his head and comes into the air space of the United States of America, where-- where do they go? It's Alaska. It's just right over the border. It is-- from Alaska that we send those out to make sure that an eye is being kept on this very powerful nation, Russia, because they are right there. They are right next to-- to our state.

If someone scripted that, they need to be shot.

Palin, her family and aides are determined to remind voters what they so liked about the governor in the first place.

After the debate and talk radio hits, the plan is to find a way to let Palin be Palin, moving her away from the pre-fab talking points and letting the down-home daughter of Wasilla be herself.

"She wants to tell her story more, and people around her do, too," added the source. "This is a governor very much on her toes, very much fed up with inaccuracies and fictions about her own life and career."

This is nonsense. Palin was being Palin. That's the problem. Of course this is the McCain people being McCain people--believe that media spin can somehow be transformed into reality. The problem isn't bad lighting. It isn't the wrong format. It isn't scripting. It's that the pick is disaster. No amount of repackaging can change that basic fact.

UPDATE: Video of  Sarah "the barracuda." Better, I guess.


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