Heh, from the department of "Black people found to be capable of language" comes a new study which tells us that blacks, "don't share similar views of the world." I'm tired, and I've been beating this drum for months now. Needless to say that anyone out there who's shocked that tend to not always agree with each other, is in trouble. The study, which was commissioned by Radio One, actually doesn't look as stupid as USA Today presents it. I can't figure out whether journalists--in particular--are just clueless, or whether this is symptom of a great ignorance and prejudice at work in the country. More likely, journalists are working on deadlines, and in that scenario, complexity in general tends to be a casualty.

On that note, check out One Drop's thread debating who has the right to define what it means to be black. I'm not sure anyone has that right. But I know who doesn't--people whose livelihood depends on drawing stark contrasts, regardless of how much said contrasts reflects the actual world. If you think reparations is a voting issue, if you haven't even given Dreams Of My Father a thorough read, but feel comfortable saying that Obama is "more white than black," if you believe that actual black people still use phrases like "Whitey" or "Black Is Beautiful" in everyday parlance, your credentials are fraudulent. More simply put, if you don't really know many black people. you probably should sit back and listen--and read. There is a reason you don't see me opining on the impact of immigration reform on the Latino communities in the Southwest...

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