Jack White takes on Jelani Cobb over at theroot. The Essence:

The last thing black people need is to take your advice to emulate right-wing extremists like Anne Coulter, who claims she hates McCain so much she'd rather vote for Clinton. Even thinking about following that course is a self-destructive diversion. We've already wasted enough time this year on a Negrofied version of the medieval debate over how many angels can dance on the head of a pin: how many of us can buck-and-wing on the bi-racial chromosomes of Barack Obama? Now that we've finally got that settled and have thrown in behind the brother, there is absolutely no rationale for unearthing the age-old questions about our relationship with the Democratic Party.  Way too much is at stake.

You know, I I think Jack makes some good points, when he gets down to it. I mean this is the debate--how far are you willing to go to get that respect? Like I said, I can't vote for McCain. But I won't vote for Hillary either. There must be something that you're willing to stand for. That said, it's the sort of issue on which reasonable people can differ. I just think Jack got too personal, especially here:

Your column on The Root ranks as the most ridiculous political idea any Negro has put forth my since my brother-in-law decided to support Clarence Thomas on the grounds that, after all, he's a brother. So ridiculous, Dr. Cobb, that at first, I thought you were kidding… and I still hope that you were.  But on the odd chance that you were serious—or that some people let themselves be swayed by  your cockamamie idea—I thought I'd better inject some common sense back into the discussion.

See it's one thing to disagree, but to act like not voting for Billary is merit-less, is weak. Black folks are the most loyal voting bloc in the country. Jelani is arguing that if that loyalty is to continue, we need to be assured that we won't be Sista Souljahed. Like I said, the other side has a point--but Jack is being condescending and dismissive with his desire to "inject some common sense back into the discussion." Argue on the point, but don't act like your point is the only argument, and that anyone who disagrees must be a victim of brain trauma

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