Bahamas

George Pendle admires airport decor: 

Witness the carpet at Singapore's Changi Airport, a vertiginous monochrome wonder that seems to mimic what one would see if you fell out of a window in the city's brightly lit Downtown Core. At the other extreme, sits tiny Rogue Valley International-Medford Airport in Oregon, whose carpet sports a Prince of Wales check, referring to the secret visit to the small town by Edward VIII in the late 1930s to open a Girl Scout camp.

Occasionally airport carpets can be too candid. The torn, gum-covered, sub-neo-constructivist carpet at London's Heathrow immediately suggests one is entering a city of delays and obstructions, while the carpet in Murmansk Airport in Northern Russia, with its unforgiving pallid grey colour scheme and aggressively thick tufts, ominously alludes to the icy tundra that surrounds it.

(Photo: Lynden Pindling International Airport, Bahamas by George Pendle)

We want to hear what you think about this article. Submit a letter to the editor or write to letters@theatlantic.com.