"Scott Walker's attempt to de-unionize the public sector in Wisconsin was a nasty piece of business. Walker sprung a far-reaching bill he didn't campaign on that was designed in large part to hamper the opposition party from winning future elections. It was not, however, a coup d'etat, as Robert Reich calls it. Walker duly passed a law through a duly-elected legislature. It's a highly unpopular law, but his opponents have democratic recourse: first a recall procedure, and then the next election. If Walker's law does not grow more popular, Democrats will overturn it when they next attain a majority, which will itself become easier due to the unpopularity of Walker's actions," - Jon Chait.

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