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Andrew Exum has questions:

[W]hile there are a lot of questions left to be answered -- Who pays for this war? Does the Congress need to authorize anything? What are the vital U.S. interests we are trying to protect? -- the question that most concerns me and pertains to readers of this blog is what happens next?

What happens if Gadhafi pulls back? Do we continue to try and press the advantage of the rebels until his government falls? Do we have the authorization to do that? Do we expect a civil war in Libya to drag out, and if so, how will we take sides? If Gadhafi falls, what comes next? What will the new Libyan government look like? Will they be friendly to U.S. interests? Someone please tell me how this ends.

(Photo: A Libyan rebel carries an ammunition belt in the streets of the eastern Libyan coastal town of Tobruk near the border with Egypt on March 16, 2011, as the forces of Libya's strongman Moamer Kadhafi pressed rebels in the west on and threatened their eastern bastion of Benghazi while UN chief Ban Ki-moon called for an immediate ceasefire. By Patrick Baz/AFP/Getty Images)

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