Noah Millman thinks bad teachers are a symptom of a bigger problem:

It’s not that hard to identify really terrible teachers. It’s much harder to design a bureaucratic evaluation mechanism properly tuned to align incentives for leaders to run their schools correctly. A major effect of the kinds of school-evaluation tools that have already been deployed has been to encourage teaching to the test above all. That may actually be an improvement in some schools, and certainly helps identify schools that are completely failing to teach – but in many others, it has incentivized the leadership to destroy much of what made the schools effective in the first place.

We want to hear what you think about this article. Submit a letter to the editor or write to letters@theatlantic.com.