Larison notes the timing of the Republican anti-Palin message:

As long as she was useful prior to the midterms, the institutions, magazines, and leaders of the movement not only tolerated her, but actively promoted her and gave her typically glowing coverage. Those that couldn’t bring themselves to praise her went out of their way not to criticize her. Now that Palin may represent a political threat to Republican chances of regaining the White House, they are suddenly very concerned about her impact on the quality of conservative argument. Their concern would be interesting if it weren’t so belated and narrowly focused on Palin.

It almost makes one believe that John McCain and Bill Kristol actually hold their base in contempt, believing them to be "poor, undereducated and easily led." And now they have to steer their flock in another direction. In some ways, I have more sympathy with the Palinites and Palin than the cynics and hollow men of Washington's GOP establishment.

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