The Guardian confirms that it was the rebellion's only jet - shot down by Qaddafi's forces. Meanwhile, an impressive variety of European airforces are revving their engines:

Spanish and Belgium fighter aircraft are due to arrive in Italy before taking part in operations over Libya, a source in Italy said on Saturday. Spain would likely send F-18 aircraft, Belgium F-16s.

Six Danish F-16 fighters have landed at the Sigonella airbase in Sicily... The Italian air force has dispatched Tornado and Eurofighter aircraft to its Trapani air base in western Sicily in readiness, although Italian prime minister Silvio Berlusconi said on Saturday that Italy was supplying bases only for now.

But Qaddafi's forces appear to have penetrated some of Benghazi's defenses  as the city's residents are already voicing anti-Western thoughts:

[Correspondent Chris McGreal in Benghazi] says there is a real wariness among the rebels that Gaddafi's forces were able to penetrate the city's defences and take over areas of what has been the main rebel stronghold in Libya since the uprising began. Many residents also feel let down by the West because it delayed taking military action after the UN resolution was passed. They believe they will not be safe until Gaddafi is deposed or dead.

And so the mission creep begins - even before the war has started.

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