NuclearGetty

Gregg Easterbrook argues that the Fukushima reactors were too old and that "old reactors designed in the 1950s and 1960s, when far less was known about controlling atomic power, need to be taken out of service and replaced with modern designs that do not have the problems experienced at Fukushima":

If the Japan accidents produce a new wave of opposition to new reactor construction, the result will be to lock into place a profusion of obsolete reactors with antiquated engineering. Japan should have replaced the Fukushima reactors with a modern station years ago. Will other nations refuse to act, and wait till the next obsolete reactor fails?

(Photo: A Greenpeace activist lights candles to form the nuclear symbol during an anti-nuclear demonstration in front of the chancellery in Berlin on March 14, 2011. By Johannes Eisele/AFP/Getty Images)

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