Today on the Dish, Andrew reengaged Palin on her life as a redacted "open book." Andrew deconstructed the empty GOP field for 2012 (read: blame shameless Fox and Palin), and, with the help of Aristotle, denounced inequality in America and the right.  Andrew offered support for Bailey's libertarian healthcare mandate, and Tom Coburn stood up to Hewitt on housing and the deficit. Andrew sided with Gates against Kristol's cheap shots, Obama gained ground over Walker, and Doug Elmendorf revealed the advantages to tackling the debt now. Glenn Reynolds preferred a syphilitic camel over Obama, the GOP lusted after styrofoam cups and pulled a Charlie Sheen in #winning. Mickey Kaus defended John Edwards, David Brooks got a blog, and gay marriage mattered less to black voters. Ross categorized everyone's sex lives into two camps, readers responded with their own tales of premature monogamy, Saletan inquired about lesbian anal, and Mike Huckabee vibrated.

Andrew urged caution in the face of John McCain and John Kerry's calls for a no-fly zone and Arab regimes realized the status quo cannot be maintained. Black African migrants were rounded up and forced to be mercenaries in Libya, and food shortages affected rebel forces. We charted the timeline of psychology and torture, and former Guantanamo prosecutor Morris Davis called out Obama for standing on a rocky pedestal, re: Libya. Afghanistan's mission to protect wasn't clear cut, and Saudi Arabia turned ripe for revolution. Some countries will always lead the world, gays wore plaid, and a blind man could see your crappy parking job. Arcades died without dollar coins, the era of cheap food ended, and humans liked avatars the more they look like us. James Parker unpacked Bieber's appeal, and an artist ordered flowers for all the mental health patients who never received them.

MHB here, VFYW here, FOTD here, chart of the day here, quotes for the day here and here, and dissents of the day here.

--Z.P.

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