Today on the Dish, Andrew rebuked Hitchens and his "Do Something" brigade on Libya, Leslie Gelb made the case for staying out, Lexington and Scoblete considered America's Iraq Syndrome, and food aid was on its way. J. Dana Stuster warned of nuclear war between India and Pakistan, Issandr El Amrani wanted an Egyptian truth commission on crimes, a former Iraqi PM laid the truth down, and Ackerman kept tabs on the steady number of Afghan insurgents. The torture that sustained Gitmo in the Bush era ended, but that didn't solve the question of the remaining prisoners.

Andrew explained why NPR's liberal bias is different than FNC's on the right, and Peter King dug himself deeper. Palin fans didn't like Newt, but it was more about the arrogance than the infidelity. Steve Kornacki eyed Romney's chances, Douthat awarded him the win by default, and Limbaugh's second caricature of Obama contradicted his first. Bernstein countered Ezra Klein on whether Republicans need their own healthcare plan, readers shared their own views of American inequality, and the economy doesn't always represent how much (or what) people consume online. Prison rape could be prevented, but Balko wasn't impressed with government efforts to do so. A new paper questioned the emotional and economic rewards of having children, and Andrew engaged Dan Savage on his conservatism and the human capacity for monogamy

Dish readers gave the beard nod, the Sullivan nod helped sell wine, Andrew studied up on a scientific approach to beards, and Jesus was probably clean-shaven. Seattle could have shared Detroit's fate, Angry Birds saved a company, cycling was the new parcour, and bicyclists weren't to blame for traffic. The great debate over rural versus urban continued, and the only way to stop humming Britney Spears is to come to terms with it. We meditated on Lent, Andrew allowed for forgivness for Newt's sins, a reader gave up the Dish, and a four-year old answered all of life's questions.

Chart of the day here, email of the day here, dissents of the day here, VFYW here, MHB here, and FOTD here.

--Z.P.

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