Today on the Dish, Andrew clarified his position on indefinite detention and torture to Greenwald, a reader gave the military their due, and a new paper revealed the conditions that make states stop torturing. Andrew countered Fareed on supplying arms to Libya, Graeme Wood humbled the US, Steven Cook urged us to have a light touch in Egypt, and we parsed Khamenei's continuing purge. Andrew backed Bagehot in treasuring others' right to offend, we tracked King's crusade, Tyler Cowen glimpsed the fiscal endgame, and the US was slowly becoming Greece. We rounded up Wisconsin reax, and Nate Silver predicted a backlash.

Massie prodded Romney's robot exterior, we poked his plastic veneer, and wondered if Limbaugh could back him. John Phillips ordered the Palin Caramel Macchiato, Bernstein un-victimized her, and Eminem could challenge her. Ezra Klein made the case for bike lanes as pro-car, Republicans prevented ex-felon votes based on partisanship, and Andrew wondered whether James O'Keefe was a journalist or a prankster with a knack for entrapment. Wilkinson brutalized Brooks, Limbaugh discovered unemployment benefits and didn't approve, and even bloggers on the right don't read many right-leaning voices. Steve Cheney rebelled against Facebook comments, industrial agriculture danced with nature American Beauty style, and Arnold Kling advised economists.

Brigham Young professors had to remind students to shave, beards don't mix well with fire-breathing, and lost and found is fun. A reader confessed his own marriage infidelities, another wanted NPR to embrace their bias, and we remembered David Broder. Eve Conant updated us on the final death throes of DADT, Andrew picked American Idol favorites, Goldblog made love to America, James Franco's brother gay-dueled, and straight men made out for celery. Yglesias award here, creepy ad watch here, hand-drawn New York here, chart of the day here,  yesterday's chart reconfigured here, history of science fiction here, VFYW here, FOTD here, and MHB here.

--Z.P.

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