Today on the Dish, we tracked the latest from Japan, a man survived two days at sea, and we gathered info on how to help. China reacted, and Mark Vernon intuited the religious meaning of the wave. Boing Boing explained power plants, Michael W. Golay assessed implications for the US, and Andrew favored nuclear energy to cut down on our carbon intake. Qaddafi's forces moved east, Niall Ferguson proposed a Helsinki Final Act, and John Lee Anderson reported from the front lines. Contra Mark Steyn, Andrew assessed Obama's temperament, Greenwald called Obama out on being untrue to his word, and the US aped torture methods from the show 24.

Brave voices on the right unleashed on Palin, Larison parsed the timing of their turn against her, but Rush came to her defense. Judd Gregg didn't underestimate her, Keith Humphreys predicted religion would derail some candidates, and Americans do want a truce.  Ronald Reagan supported collective bargaining, Heather Mac Donald applauded Wisconsin's Republicans, Haley Barbour's press secretary let loose, bias is hard to admit, Readers defended one man's confession of infidelity, John Corvino applied the monogamy debate to gays, and Alex Massie kept tabs on the Lib Dems. Standardized testing is a farce, female teachers helped women choose math and science, and Alan Jacobs wanted to end year-end student evaluations. DC commuters hitched a ride, cupcakes and gang violence overlapped, and children love cartoons more than they love sugary cereals. Ta-Nehisi demystified White Flight, digital storage shrunk, and Will Wilkinson qualified the happiness of the happiest man in America.

Photos of where children sleep here, non-racist jokes here, quotes for the day here and here, correction of the day here, life through a dog's eyes here, Malkin award here, Goldblog bait here, headline of the day here, VFYW here, MHB here, and FOTD here.

--Z.P.

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