Today on the Dish, Andrew deconstructed the divisions on the right's foreign policy, Wilkinson weighed the suffering factor in Libya, Julian Sanchez connected Bush and Obama on universal morality, and Andy Bacevich concentrated on removing Qaddafi. Andrew began to understand his pessimism as stemming from the Irish belief in Sod's law, and wondered if Obama had meep-meeped him again. Larison abandoned hope for an anti-war right and theorized why Germany didn't veto the UN resolution, and Rory Stewart stuck it to both pro and anti-interventionist sides. Ackerman wanted us to call the war in Libya a war, Adam Garfinkle critiqued our slipshod strategy, and Fox battled CNN on the other Libyan front. A new report outlined the torture under Bush as a form of warfare, rather than an attempt to stop a ticking time bomb, and Heather Hurlburt distrusted the Libyan endgame. Misurata took a turn for the worse, the rebel force is smaller than expected, and Libya isn't WWII. Twenty thousand may have marched in Syria, Assad may be caving, but the violence ratcheted up.

Catholics favor gay marriage (even the ones who attend church weekly), and Andrew held out hope for a change in DOMA and immigration policy. Andrew soaked up the results of the Coalition government's austerity measures, Nick Clegg left his mic on, and Andy Sumner examined international poverty. A straight, Catholic Republican student in Indiana supports gay marriage, Pareene got giddy over gay Republican candidate Fred Karger, and readers didn't underestimate T-Paw. Julian Sanchez pondered copyright and Google Books, Caitlin Truman endorsed euthanasia for the dead relationship, and a judge grappled with sentencing based on numbers alone. LSD confronts you with yourself, Arizona brought a tank to stop a cockfight, Dana Goldstein admired a charter school's dedication to diversity, and Andrew was off to celebrate the new pro-faith show of "Book Of Mormon." Groupon offered solutions for being hungry or bored, Camille Paglia praised Liz Taylor's body, and Lileks found a man who'd never heard of an iPad. A paywall is less humiliating than a pledge drive, and this doctor wanted to solve your symptoms the tech way.

Chart of the day here, quotes for the day here, here, here, and here, VFYW here, MHB here, and FOTD here.

-- Z.P.

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