Today on the Dish, Andrew asked conservativism to consider raising income tax rates, and bemoaned the slim pickings for 2012 since the GOP has gone fringe. Newt feared a secular socialist Islamist America, Romney's phoniness trumped all, and the Tea Party still tilted towards unbearably white. Andrew and Dan Savage gave the Obamaites credit for changing course on gay rights, TNC considered Ferraro's white populism, and Philip Greenspun questioned a $40 million paywall. Herman Cain played the black conservative victim card, Ezra Klein wanted to tweak Social Security to save them, and Alexis tracked the death of the first electric car (in 1900).

Rebel forces hadn't quite overtaken Qaddafi's hometown, bodies piled up, and recents victories were reversed. Douthat didn't think Obama owned up to his real choice in Libya, but the American public approved of the Goldilocks war. Exum and feared a stalemate, Marc Lynch put Arab opinion with Obama, Roger Cohen urged ruthlessness, and Andrew wondered if our intervention would ruin nascent rebellions in other countries. Freddie dismantled the metaphor of Libya as an old woman, Israel yawned, and Palin named the war a squirmish. Nick Kimbrell compiled a soundtrack the the Arab revolutions, Crowley stood by his disapproval of Manning's treatment, and the US challenged authoritarian regimes for who could kill the most prisoners. Matt Alt contrasted the Japanese coverage of the crisis, and Goldman Sachs ordered its employees to stay in Japan.

Andrew filtered his belief in God through his Catholicism, Linton Weeks assessed our kibbles and bits society, and readers got blasted by the Dish firehose. South Park seeped into Andrew's subconscious, a reader re-invented the Kinsey Gaffe, and beardage was still trending. Social networking could end bullying, love could save architecture, and sometimes incentives corrupt. Top teenage dirty words here, ultimate spoiler here, quotes for the day here, here and here, MHB here, FOTD here, VFYW here, and VFYW contest winner #43 here.

--Z.P.

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