Despite Zakaria's support for intervention in Libya, Joe Klein remains a pessimist:

[T]here is a segregation of talking heads--they tend to be either foreign or domestic. Those who specialize in foreign or military affairs tend to know little or nothing about what's happening within our borders. Those who specialize in domestic politics tend not to understand that vital impact on our national security that a country like Pakistan, for example, plays. Those who've argued for Libya intervention have been, for the most part, those who do not focus on the waning economic power of the United States, the need to rethink our long-term deficits, the need to invest in our future. They tend to think more about the Middle East than the Middle West. That leads to skewed priorities.

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