So says Dan DiMaggio, an employee in the booming standardized testing industry. Jessica Lussenhop reports:

Although DiMaggio had been through a training process, he found himself tripped up as he began scoring the essays. What made the organization "good" as opposed to "excellent"? What happens when the kid doesn't answer the question at all, but writes with excellent organization about whatever the hell he wants?

Along the same lines, Dana Goldstein worries about test-score inflation and "the unintended consequences of well-intentioned standards-and-accountability education reforms."

We want to hear what you think about this article. Submit a letter to the editor or write to letters@theatlantic.com.