Gene Healy of the Cato Institute is disgusted with Libya hawks:

 That allegedly serious people are proposing, as Defense Secretary Gates puts it, “the use of the US military in another country in the Middle East,” ought to be appalling.  If the last ten years haven’t convinced you that a little prudence and caution might serve us well in foreign policy, what would? Recently Senators John McCain (R-AZ) and Joe Lieberman (I-CT), the Bobbsey Twins of knee-jerk interventionism, chastised Obama for dragging his feet on the path toward war.  They called for arming the rebels and implementing a no-fly zone, for starters. “I love the military,” Sen. McCain complained “but they always seem to find reasons why you can’t do something rather than why you can.”  Alas, “can’t is the cancer of happen,” as Charlie Sheen reminded us recently.

And in the Washington Examiner, he argues against giving them an inch lest they take billions of dollars and years of manpower:

...let's stipulate that NATO warplanes (mainly U.S. fighters, of course) could deny pro-Gadhafi forces the ability to deploy air power. That would not impede their ability to murder on the ground. What then? NATO flew more than 100,000 sorties in Operation Deny Flight, the no-fly zone imposed over Bosnia from 1993 to 1995, yet that wasn't enough to prevent ethnic cleansing or the killing of thousands of Bosnians in the 1995 Srebrenica massacre. It did, however, help pave the way for a wider war and a 12-year nation-building mission. In for a penny, in for a pound -- intervention tends to have a logic of its own.

 

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