Chris Blattman cites two new papers on economic and political stability in Africa concerning sex workers. One studied the implications of the turmoil after the December 2007 presidential election in Kenya:

Income, expenditures, and consumption dramatically declined for a broad segment of the rural population for the duration of the conflict. To make up for the income shortfall, women who supply transactional sex engaged in higher risk sex both during and after the crisis. While this particular crisis was likely too short for these behavioral responses to seriously increase the risk of HIV or other STIs for these women, such responses could have long-term repercussions for health in countries with longer or more frequent crises.

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