An old study had researchers proposition strangers. All of the women declined while many of the men accepted. Thomas Macaulay Millar reads a new study that claims “when women are presented with proposers who are equivalent in terms of safety and sexual prowess, they will be equally likely as men to engage in casual sex":

[Men are] perceived terribly by women, including but not only our potential sex partners.  This perception may be entirely based not on something we’ve done but things other men have done.  On my account, though, it is based as much on the social structures we participate in as men, and the ways they operate in the culture.  On my account, as long as there is a lot of rape and not a lot of remedy, as long as there is slut-shaming and double-standards, as long as the denial of the technologies women need to mitigate the risks of unintended pregnancy and disease, then they’re going to look askance at us, and they’re going to act like they have more risk and less to gain from sex with us, because in fact they do. 

Which reminds me: sometimes, it's great to be gay.

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