Marc Lynch takes a big picture view of the Middle Eastern uprisings. A snippet:

[T]he Obama administration is now wisely beginning to think regionally and strategically about where the region is headed.  The upheavals have obviously exposed the myth that the status quo could be sustained indefinitely, and that Arab authoritarian regimes could be counted upon to suppress the preferences of their people indefinitely. The administration has already been using the new urgency to push regimes to begin serious reforms, and should continue to do so.  They are trying to say that the U.S. is not abandoning its friends, but rather that it can only protect them and help them if they take the initiative and begin meaningful reforms immediately. Whether "reform" can satisfy a revolutionary moment remains very much uncertain.  But what is not uncertain is that even where existing regimes survive, they will be far more attentive to the views of these newly empowered publics. 

Video of the Egyptian and Tunisian revolutions set to Carl Sagan's Earth The Pale Blue Dot via Exum.

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