J. Peter Nixon views Libya through a religious lens:

[W]arparticularly modern warrepresents the height of human pride and arrogance, an arrogance that forgets that God is God and we are not.  Rather than being fought over territory or to settle rival dynastic claims, modern wars are increasing fought to shape the course of History itself and to usher in some form of utopia, whether communist, fascist, or liberal-democratic.  They are a form of eschatology masquerading as politics.

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