One has been distant but supportive of the unions in response to the events in Wisconsin; the other is in the news daily. And yet polling in Wisconsin suggests that the distant and relatively quiet one is gaining ground:

Obama’s approval rating sits at a comfortable 53%-42%, above the national average, and a nine-point improvement in the poll from November. (In November -- after the Democrats' shellacking in the midterms -- the president’s approval in the poll was split at 44%-43%.)

By contrast, Walker’s approval rating is upside down – with 43% approving and 53% disapproving of how he’s handling his job. Walker’s “strongly disapprove” is a sky-high 45%; Obama’s is 26%. Walker’s favorability rating – also 43%-53% -- mirrors his approval. His negative rating is up 18 points from November, when his rating was 45%/35%. His “strongly unfavorable” is up to 41% from a “very unfavorable” rating of just 19% in November.

Few seem to know for sure if the WSJ story about the State Senate Dems coming home is true. I rather think their point has been made, however dumb it was to run away. It might not be so easy for a Republican to win Wisconsin in 2012.

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