City_pict3a_custom

Krulwich admires the photography of Russia's Alexey Titarenko:

We're two-thirds water, after all. Our cells carry, "a concentration of that indescribably and liquid brew which is compounded in varying proportions of salt and sun and time." And so, like water, we flow. ... People, said Loren Eiseley (and, I suppose, all living things) are water's way of escaping the seas, the air, the streams. Because human cells are little packages of moisture, of salt water, if you want a sciency metaphor, look at Alexey Titarenko's photos and see these crowds as blurry, wool-wearing tides of sea water, moving along streets, rolling in and out.

(Photo: Untitled, (Crowd 2), 1993 by Alexey Titarenko/Nailya Alexander Gallery, New York)

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