A reader writes:

The British as a bunch of imperialists who persecuted our grandfathers?  What an alien worldview.  Certainly we never heard anything like that growing up in the Murphy household.

Another is more direct:

My own family came to the US from Ireland and Scotland.  My great great grandparents left Scotland to escape the Highland Clearances. An entry in the Bible  they brought with them says, "We must go to America or stay here and die".  The bitterness they_39509181_clear_203 felt over leaving their beloved Highlands was passed down through five generations so that as a child I was taught that the British had persecuted my family and that if they had stayed in either Scotland or Ireland, they and I wouldn't be alive. Huckabee apparently doesn't know that "Americans" are from or are descended from people who once lived in British colonies - people who do not share his view that the British Empire was some nifty thing.

Another:

I seem to remember something from grade school about thirteen colonies and the Revolutionary War.  What is wrong with these people?

Another comments on Huck's backpedaling:

He got the false information out there anyway, didn't he? I wonder how many people will be aware of the correction? Precious few, and certainly not the ones who need to hear it. He did exactly what he intended to do - insinuate Obama's "foreignness" and, yes, "blackness". And I'd wager he did it because:

Huckabee just wrapped up several days of events to promote his book, "A Simple Government" in Iowa this week and plans to head to Texas, South Carolina and several other states over the next few days.

He's got books to sell and bigots to court.

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