Globalwarmingpolitics

A study from a few years ago found that the "probability of perceiving global warming as a threat increases with education among Democrats, but decreases with education among Republicans."

The probability of perceiving global warming as a threat increases with education among Democrats, but decreases with education among Republicans. Only two respondents out of a thousand described themselves as "strong Democrats" or "strong Republicans" with less than an 8th grade education, so the crossover at far left in [the above figure] should not be over-interpreted.

The study's authors theorize that partisan echo chambers on the Internet are partially to blame. Henry Farrell is skeptical:

If Gentzkow and Shapiro are right, then there is less ideological segregation in consumption of Internet information sources than one might imagine e.g. from looking at blogs alone. It is possible, for example, that highly educated strong Republicans may be exposed to both contrarian and conventional sources of information on climate change, but trust the former much more than the latter because of partisan cues.

Follow ups here and here.

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