A reader writes:

I've long enjoyed reading Dan Savage's material, but this talk of "Dan Savage the Conservative" has been bothering me. Since when did family cohesiveness become the sole domain of conservatives? Yes, Dan has done a lot to promote "stable, livable, and happy relationships" and he should be commended for that. But to say that because he values and promotes these things, he's a conservative? Frankly, I find that a little insulting.

I come from an almost ridiculously tight-knit family, and looking back at my childhood (I'm now 26) I can see that every single action that my parents took was designed to promote my ability to enter into a stable, livable, and happy relationship of my own someday. These same parents have been protesting at the Wisconsin capitol in the past weeks in support of the unions, and have raised two children who are, by most measures, fairly more liberal than they are.

Can't happy families be an issue that doesn't carry any implication of political affiliation?

Another writes:

Mainstream doesn't mean conservative, just as understanding that lying to your spouse is wrong is just simple human decency, not conservatism. I realize that an overly expansive definition for the term conservative is something you just do, but words have meanings. Even though family and honesty are important values, it doesn't mean that conservatives ought to be granted the exclusive right to espouse them.

We want to hear what you think about this article. Submit a letter to the editor or write to letters@theatlantic.com.