Dish alum Will Di Novi conveys the feeling of Mike Leigh's quiet films:

[Leigh] captures the seemingly glacial pace at which periods in our lives unfold, and the suddenness with which they inexplicably vanish. As Tom and Gerri lie in bed after another night of Mary’s Chardonnay-induced theatrics, their thoughts begin to drift towards their own mortality. “We’re becoming history,” Tom murmurs, stunned by the thought and yet strangely gratified to glimpse the faded outlines of a life well-lived.  It’s an unsentimental grace note plucked from the cacophony of everyday life, a moment of such intimacy and candor that it confounds the idea there is anything ordinary about these people at all.

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