Eryn Green contemplates hair loss:

The fear of balding continues to persist in an age increasingly obsessed with youth (see: the supposedly Samson-esque follicles of everyone from Tom Brady to Justin Bieber) and the preservation of vitality (see: patriarch of the Kardashian clan, Bruce Jenner). Baldness continues to represent some fundamental, inescapable, awful truths for men: You will get old. It will not be pretty. People will think differently of you. One day you will wilt, and eventually, die. Baldness reminds those of us doomed to it that we are masters of our destiny only so much. We are men, and men can do great, impossible, incredible things. But we can't fight the tide.

I tried for a while: Rogaine, Propecia, and then gave up. Same goes for trying to disguise the gray (actually white) in beard. But so many men tell me they like the balding, bearded, S&P daddy type, I'm beginning to regain some confidence in my late 40s. Oddly, you get more attention from the twentysomethings than from your peers. Exotic becomes erotic, I suppose. Or they need some therapy. Green quotes Professor Luis Garza, M.D., author of a new study that could suggest a cure:

I think it's very likely that by the end of your lifetime, there will be a pill or a cream, kind of like there is for Viagra, which your insurance [might not] cover and you might have to apply repeatedly but yeah, it'll keep your hair growing.

Ian Crouch salutes the best bald men of literature:

Fiction thrives on physical particularities. As cosmetic medicine thinks of new ways to make us all look the same, we should cling to the notable differences, lest the great characters of our literature come to seem quaintly deformed to readers in the future.

(Video via Copyranter)

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